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WHEN WILL WE EVER LEARN?

 

Pete Seeger, Songwriter and Champion of Folk Music, Dies at 94

From the page at YouTube where this was posted:

On July 26, 1956, the House of Representatives voted 373 to 9 to cite Pete Seeger and seven others (including playwright Arthur Miller) for contempt, as they failed to cooperate with House Un-American Activities Committee (HUAC) in their attempts to investigate alleged subversives and communists. Pete Seeger testified before the HUAC in 1955.

In one of Pete’s darkest moments, when his personal freedom, his career, and his safety were in jeopardy, a flash of inspiration ignited this song. The song was stirred by a passage from Mikhail Sholokhov’s novel “And Quiet Flows the Don”. Around the world the song traveled and in 1962 at a UNICEF concert in Germany, Marlene Dietrich, Academy Award-nominated German-born American actress, first performed the song in French, as “Qui peut dire ou vont les fleurs?” Shortly after she sang it in German. The song’s impact in Germany just after WWII was shattering. It’s universal message, “let there be peace in the world” did not get lost in its translation. To the contrary, the combination of the language, the setting, and the great lyrics has had a profound effect on people all around the world. May it have the same effect today and bring renewed awareness to all that hear it.

 

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About cynthiamysteryauthor

I am a painter of Narrative Maritime Americana Primitives turned mystery writer. My writing career began as a free-lance local news reporter for a highly acclaimed south of Boston daily. My painting career began in my commercial painter father's studio when he taught me to mix colors at age four. Both parents attended art school and although my father turned to sign design and painting to support the family and my mother got into interior decorating and was the pastry chef for Chillingsworth French Restaurant in Brewster on Cape Cod, their first love was sketching portraits. My mentors, Ralph and Martha Cahoon, renowned primitive painters who settled in Osterville on Cape Cod in the ninteen-forties, sealed my fate as a primitive painter. Living on historic Cape Cod and being addicted to history, I began to tell stories on canvas. Cape Cod Life magazine called my work, "time travel on canvas". A folk art quilt was purchased by the Tokyo, Japan National Art Gallery for their permanent collection and my paintings and primitive hooked rugs are in private collections world-wide. I wrote my first novel (unpublished, of course) at fifteen and since then, have always written. Falling in love with British mysteries steered me into my current bliss. Agatha Christie is the mother of cozies and cozies suit me just fine because I can "paint" the settings and the quirky characters with my laptop rather than paint brushes and paints. I never set my stories in places I do not know intimately. In fact, a foray to Puerto Rico last year to do research led us to decide to escape from Cape Cod cold and snow to the sunny Caribbean this winter and forevermore. Back to Cape Cod to live on our forty-four boat every summer, however. We sold our antique sea captain's house on Cape Cod, down-sized our belongings, move aboard and semi-retired; I to write mysteries and Ken to write an economy blog. Life is good.
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